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As water continues to rise, residents and business owners are scrambling to get moved out.

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As water continues to rise, residents and business owners in flood-prone parts of Dearborn County are scrambling to get moved out.
Flooding in Aurora as of about 12:30 p.m. Feb. 23, 2018.

Aurora residents, businesses brace for flooding

AURORA, Ind. -- As water continues to rise, residents and business owners are scrambling to get moved out. 

At Kennett Family Oil Marathon, work was underway to get everything out Friday. It's been in the family for nearly 70 years. Owner Wayne Kennett said he's been through two floods there, and three living in Aurora.

"We're leaving town, we're unhooking pumps, emptying the store," he said.

Shutting off the gas pumps at Kennett Family Oil Marathon in downtown Aurora, IN. #flooding @WCPO @Cincywxman @eagle993 pic.twitter.com/Ax5UbXaqXT

— Dave Marlo (@DJMarloInKY) February 23, 2018

They boxed up bags of chips, cleared out the fridges and hauled away the pumps.

Just down the road, Aurora Tire Center was also shutting down.

"The river's coming up," mechanic Jerry Hoskins said. "It's going to get us."

Resident Toot Myers said she isn't worried for her house up on a hill, but she's worried for her neighbors. 

"It will go up real bad, and then down and leave a mess," Myers said. "Mother nature's playing hell with us now."

Streets covered in downtown Aurora, Indiana #flooding @WCPO @Cincywxman @eagle993 pic.twitter.com/wSCR9GkGUD

— Dave Marlo (@DJMarloInKY) February 23, 2018

Debris was already floating in Friday afternoon, including what appeared to be a huge part of a building or car stuck in a downtown park.

Fire and rescue were mobilizing people out of parts of the downtown all the way from the river up to George Street as water continued to rise. The Red Cross opened a shelter in Lawrenceburg High School, 300 Tiger Boulevard in Lawrenceburg. They've also got help from surrounding departments, taking calls from anyone who needs help all night and making sure no one ventures into the water.

"We're going to be out of work for a while, and a lot of people are going to be out of their homes and out of work," Hoskins said.

A lot of people have been making comparisons to the 1997 flood. But for the people who live and work here, it's not a competition.

"It's heartbreaking," Hoskins said. 

Mayor Donnie  Hastings said he hopes it's not as bad as 1997 this time, but they're ready.

"Our fire department, they're experts at moving debris back into the river," he said. "But we'll cross that bridge when we get to it."

The Dearborn County Commissioners issued a disaster declaration Friday evening. 

County officials also said the following roads were closed:

Click here for more road closures around the Tri-State.

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