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Meteorologist Jennifer Ketchmark discusses how much water it takes to float a car.

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As water continues to rise, residents and business owners are scrambling to get moved out.

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Although the Ohio River floodwaters crested and started receding Tuesday night, heavy rains over the past 30 hours have river levels climbing once more. Monitoring stations show the river has pushed into moderate flood stage at over 56 feet. Predictions show the river climbing to an estimated crest of 59.4 feet by Monday. That would easily make it the worst flooding Greater Cincinnati has seen since March 5, 1997, when the river hit 64.7 feet. On Friday morning, crews in Covington, Kentucky, will be out installing flood gates on 16th Street near the Licking River levee and on Bakewell Street near the Ohio River. They already installed the Madison Street flood gate earlier this week.

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Cincinnati police have been closing roads along the Ohio River Friday morning.

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Village officials declared a state of emergency in New Richmond.

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How does late February 2018 flooding on the Ohio River compare to past years?

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It's not over yet. Although the Ohio River floodwaters crested and started receding Tuesday night, heavy rains over the past 30 hours have river levels climbing once more. Monitoring stations show the river has pushed into moderate flood stage at over 56 feet. Predictions show the river climbing to an estimated crest of 59.4 feet by Monday. That would easily make it the worst flooding Greater Cincinnati has seen since March 5, 1997, when the river hit 64.7 feet. On Friday morning, crews in Covington, Kentucky, will be out installing flood gates on 16th Street near the Licking River levee and on Bakewell Street near the Ohio River. They already installed the Madison Street flood gate earlier this week.

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The driver of this car is safe, but had to abandon a car Friday morning when it got stuck in floodwaters. Although the Ohio River's floodwaters crested and started receding Tuesday night, heavy rains over the past 30 hours have river levels climbing once more.  Monitoring stations show the river has pushed into moderate flood stage at over 56 feet. Predictions show the river climbing to an estimated crest of 59.4 feet by Tuesday. That would easily make it the worst flooding Greater Cincinnati has seen since March 5, 1997, when the river hit 64.7 feet.
CLERMONT COUNTY, OHIO. Feb. 25, 2018. Deputy Pigman, Capt. Sellars and Chief Deputy Stratton patrolled floodwaters in Clermont County for anyone who needed help.
AURORA, IND. Feb. 25, 2018. Much of this Dearborn County community was submerged as the Ohio River spilled well above its banks.

Ohio River flooding: River crests at 60.5 Sunday night

The Ohio River crested at 60.5 feet Sunday evening, according to the National Weather Service. 

The Ohio River at Cincinnati is cresting now at 60.5 feet. It will slowly recede but remain at a moderate stage much of the week @wcpo #Cincyws #inwx #Kywx pic.twitter.com/hunwAQ42OQ

— Sherry Hughes (@Sherry_Hughes) February 26, 2018

Although the Ohio River's floodwaters initially crested and started receding Tuesday night, heavy rains throughout the week had river levels climbing once more. 

Current river levels make the flooding the worst Greater Cincinnati has seen since March 5, 1997, when the river hit 64.7 feet.

The latest forecast has the Ohio River in Cincinnati cresting at 60.6 ft. In terms of top ranks this would tie #22 which was 60.6ft on 3/28/1936. @WCPO #CincyWx pic.twitter.com/n23D6r12tH

— Barak Shapiro (@Barak_Shapiro) February 25, 2018

On Friday morning, crews in Covington, Kentucky, were out installing floodgates on 16th Street near the Licking River levee and on Bakewell Street near the Ohio River. They already installed the Madison Street floodgate earlier this week.

Here are the issues that the National Weather Service says come up as the river rises:

56.5 feet: Significant flooding of California occurs. Backwater flooding along the Little Miami River affects basements and some first level flooding of businesses and homes, with low-lying areas from California to Newtown also experiencing this flooding. The East End experiences flooding of some streets, basements of homes and businesses, as well as low-lying areas near New Richmond in Clermont County. State Route 8 in Kentucky is flooded in low areas, as well as state Route 56 in Indiana and U.S. Route 52 in Ohio.

57 feet: Flooding surrounds homes between U.S. Route 52 and the river in East End, California and areas of Anderson Township. Backwater flooding along the Little Miami and Nine Mile Creek surrounds low-lying homes and businesses in Pierce Township. Water also encroaches on homes in New Richmond. Ludlow and Bromley in Kentucky become flooded in low areas, as well as Aurora, Indiana, along Judiciary and Water Streets. Portions of Route 52 in Ohio, state Route 56 in Indiana, and state Route 8 in Kentucky are flooded.

58 feet: Numerous homes and businesses are either surrounded by water, water in basements or on main levels. Backwater flooding occurs along the Little Miami, flooding low-lying streets and properties. East End, California, New Richmond, Bromley, Ludlow, and Aurora and areas near Lawrenceburg outside the floodwall are most impacted. Buildings at Coney Island flood. The area around Freeman Avenue and along Mehring Way floods, as well as between Gest and Elm on Pete Rose Way.

59 feet: Much of state Route 52 is flooded from Cincinnati to New Richmond. Significant flooding occurs in California, Ohio, with several roads, Coney Island and Riverbend Music Theater mostly underwater. Backwater flooding affects many roads in Anderson Township. Several low roads in the East End are also flooded. Portions of state Route 8 in northern Kentucky become flooded, as well as portions of Lawrenceburg and Aurora, Indiana. Basement flooding of low-lying homes and businesses is widespread.

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